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Seymour Norte

Seymour Norte Overview
Islets

North Seymour Island, nestled within the majestic Galápagos Islands of Ecuador, stands as a beacon for wildlife enthusiasts and avid travelers from around the globe. Spanning a relatively modest area of approximately 1.83 km² (0.73 sq mi), this island is much more than its size suggests. It is a thriving natural habitat, bursting with a rich tapestry of wildlife that draws visitors into a world where nature reigns supreme.

The island's compact landmass belies the incredible diversity of life it nurtures. Here, the natural world unfolds in all its splendor, offering a sanctuary for a wide range of species that have adapted to its unique environment. The geological history of North Seymour Island is as fascinating as its inhabitants. Formed from the uplift of submarine lava formations, it showcases an intriguing landscape of flat plateaus and rocky outcrops, interspersed with low, bushy vegetation.

This geological phenomenon has not only shaped the island's physical appearance but also its ecological dynamics. The uplifted terrain has given rise to distinct habitats, each supporting different forms of life. From the rocky shores that border the island to the arid interiors, every corner of North Seymour tells a story of adaptation and survival.

Moreover, the island's historical significance adds another layer to its allure. It is named after the English nobleman Lord Hugh Seymour and reflects a rich, albeit complex, colonial past that intertwines with the island's natural history.

Wildlife and Biodiversity

Land Iguanas: North Seymour Island is home to nearly 2,500 land iguanas, a species not native to the island but introduced from Baltra Island in the 1930s. These iguanas are now thriving and play a significant role in the island's ecosystem.
 
Birds: The island is renowned for its abundant birdlife, including large populations of blue-footed boobies, magnificent frigatebirds, swallow-tailed gulls, common noddies, and frigatebirds. The area is a crucial fishing site for marine birds and offers opportunities to observe the mating dances of blue-footed boobies and the nesting behaviors of frigatebirds.
 
Marine Life: North Seymour is surrounded by rich marine biodiversity, featuring sharks, rays, and various fish species are all present in the rich marine biodiversity that surrounds North Seymour. Snorkeling and diving around the island reveal the underwater wonders, including colorful reef fish, sea turtles, and occasionally sharks like the hammerhead or tiger shark.
 
Geology and Formation
North Seymour Island was formed by the uplift of a submarine lava formation, resulting in a flat and rocky terrain with low, bushy vegetation. The uplifted layers of sediment have created a unique landscape characterized by its arid vegetation zone.
 

Human Impact and Conservation

Historically, the island has faced challenges such as the introduction of invasive species like rats, which have been eradicated in efforts to protect the native fauna. Conservation efforts continue to play a crucial role in maintaining the island's ecological balance.
 

Visitor Experience

Trekking and Exploration: North Seymour offers visitors a circular trail for exploration, providing a closer look at its diverse wildlife and unique landscapes. The trek includes coastal regions as well as the island's interior, featuring encounters with sea lions, marine iguanas, and various bird species.


Snorkeling and Diving: The waters around North Seymour are among the best snorkeling and diving sites in the Galápagos, rich in marine life due to the upwelling phenomenon in the sea. Snorkelers and divers can witness a vibrant underwater world, including sea turtles and various species of sharks.


Accessibility: Located near Baltra Island, North Seymour is easily accessible and is a popular day-tour destination from Puerto Ayora on Santa Cruz Island. Its proximity to Baltra, which houses one of the main airports in the Galápagos, makes it an ideal starting point for exploring the archipelago.
 

Highlights and Interesting Facts

No Permanent Human Population: The island is uninhabited by humans, allowing wildlife to thrive in a relatively undisturbed environment.
 
Historical Significance: Named after the English nobleman Lord Hugh Seymour, the island's naming history reflects its colonial past.

Diverse Vegetation: While the vegetation is sparse, species such as Palo Santo and Opuntia cacti are prevalent, providing vital support for the island's wildlife.
 
Unique Behavior of Marine Iguanas: At times, marine iguanas on North Seymour have displayed the unusual behavior of eating land vegetation.
 
In summary, North Seymour Island is a microcosm of the Galápagos' unique biodiversity and natural beauty, making it a must-visit destination for anyone interested in wildlife, nature, and the extraordinary evolutionary history of this remarkable archipelago.

Fast Facts about Seymour Norte

Main Features: Frigatebirds, Marine Fossils, Sea Lions
Interaction In Site: Dinghy Ride, Snorkeling, Hiking
Type of Landing: Dry Landing: Off a Dinghy ride in Bridge/rocks
Fitness: Medium/High

Animals


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*Visit point inclusion is subject to cruise programs and logistics. These are regulated by the galapagos national park.