Huaorani Ecolodge
Categories: First Class, $100 to $199, Medium, Coca & Yasuni, High, Other
Huaorani Lodge
Starting At: $799 USD
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Fitness: Medium - High
Length: 3 - 5 Days
Places: Coca - Ecuador
Users Rating 5 from 7 ratings

Comfort
Program
Location

Award winning Huaorani Ecolodge is settled deep in primary rain forest, operated by Huaorani villagers and among the most isolated ethnic villages in the world. A life changing experience where guests will interact with locals, learning how to climb trees, use a blowgun, and be part of a 2-day journey down the Shiripuno river. Endless discoveries among exotic wildlife can be observed, monkeys, tropical birds among other species can be spotted down the Shiripuno river in dugout canoes or kayaks.

Huaorani Ecolodge Highlights

Huaorani Ecolodge, a small and secluded group of villagers hosting up to 10 guests in Eco-sensitive bungalows. Every aspect of the lodge’s construction was thoroughly evaluated, ensuring a highly sustainable project. Local villagers were fully involved in the project and are currently the predominant staff members. Thatched roofs, wooden cabins among other building materials were all personally handpicked by locals, its location was built at a desired distance by neighboring communities.

Huaorani Ecolodge Details

 

LAND (Quito – Shell)

Transport: Vehicle or minibus
Schedule: 06:00 – 11:00
Pick up point: Hotel
Travel time: 5 Hours
Includes: Pickup, breakfast, viewpoint stops
Transport rate: $250 per person (includes AIR)

Land transport to shell is optional, using the lodge shuttle is highly recommended. Services include Hotel pickup, scenic stops, breakfast & reaching the airport on time. Guests reaching Shell on their own are not eligible for a lower rate as the transport service is offered as a whole.

 

AIR (Shell – Lodge)

Transport: 3 Private small aircraft’s
Flight time: 30 Minutes per way
Planes capacity: 3 & 5 guests
Departing days: 7 Days a week
Luggage allowance: 10 Pounds
Transport rate: $250 per person (includes LAND)

Air transport to Huoarani Ecolodge is mandatory, private aircraft’s transport guest to the lodge. Given the rain forest’s unpredictable weather conditions, flight delays can occur. Please have at least a day in between with your international flight to avoid inconveniences.

 

LAND (Campsite – Coca)

Departs: After morning activity
Transport: Vehicle or minibus
Travel time: 2 Hours
Dropoff: Coca airport

 

AIR (Coca – Quito)

Transport: Commercial airline
Flight time: 40 Minute flight
Cost: $112 per person
Route: Coca – Quito

 

BUS (Quito – Coca – Quito)

Bus terminal: Quitumbe (south)
Travel time: Approximately 8 hours
Bus frequency: Every 2 to 3 hours
Bus fare: Approximately $10 per person
Pick up time: Approx 11:00 am
Luggage restriction: None
Pick up point: La mision hotel

 

FLIGHT (Quito – Coca – Quito)

Departs from: Quito only
Flight time: 40 Minutes
Commercial airlines: Tame-aerogal
Ticket fare:
$180 (subject to change)
Departure time: Aprox 10:00am (subject to change)
Luggage restriction: 20 Kilos – 44 Pounds
Pick up point: Airport upon arrival

Huaorani Ecolodge Features

Huaorani Ecolodge Features

Huaorani with blowgun

The Huaorani’s

A once completely isolated indigenous ethnic group that over the years have begun to be integrated and involved with society by means of Eco tourism. The Huaorani people live deep in the Ecuadorian rain forest, full of beliefs and culture they now welcome small groups of guests at a time to explore their land and traditions in an incredible and engaging journey.

The Lodge

Huaorani Ecolodge, provides accommodations in a style harmonious with the surrounding environment and the Huaorani culture. The lodge is cozy, providing accommodation for a maximum of ten people housed in five comfortable, traditionally built, palms thatched cabins. The dining area has a lightly stocked bar. The whole area is covered with traditional Huaorani-style palm thatching and comfortably seats everyone.

Camping

The well-constructed and comfortable Huaorani Adventure Campsite, provides basic accommodations with the surrounding environment and the Huaorani culture. The accommodation consists of tents set on four individual raised platforms, one meter above the ground. Each tent protects you from the mosquitos but is open to the fresh air and the sounds of the forest, for an authentic adventure camping experience. The campsite has no electricity and candles provide light. A generator is turned on once a day to pump water from the river. Please bring your cameras charged and a good flashlight.

Authentic Experience

Please keep in mind 4 and 5 day programs are shifted towards the end of the program to a different location for a more engaging experience, the last night accommodation will be in a campsite with tents.

Huaorani Ecolodge Itineraries 2016

Day 1

Your journey to the Amazon begins early in the morning after being picked up at your hotel. Leaving the bustling metropolis of Quito, you will be treated to the beautiful sceneries of the Ecuadorian countryside as transportation heads south, transitioning from the Andes to the Amazon (locally known as the Oriente). The excursion winds along the impressive Avenue of Volcanoes—a strip of 14 active, semi-active and dormant volcanic mountains—passing traditional haciendas, indigenous villages and protected natural areas, giving you a taste for the local culture. With luck and clear weather, you’ll be able to see the remarkably steep peaks in all their glory, including the cone-shaped Cotopaxi, one of the highest active volcanoes in the world, and Tungurahua, which has ongoing eruptions.

Baños (bah-nyos), named for its thermal baths that draw thousands of visitors per year and known for its adrenaline-pumping adventure sports and melcocha taffy, will be the first major town on the way. Your journey will continue into its surrounding green landscapes punctuated by beautiful cascading waterfalls, riding adjacent to the Agoyan River (which changes name to Pastaza once it crosses into the province of the same name) while passing under several tunnels.

Heading onward to the jungle, you’ll start to notice changes in vegetation, with Spanish moss, bananas and tropical palms beginning to dominate the countryside. Four or five hours later, you will arrive to the town of Shell, named after the oil company. This hosts the third busiest airport in Ecuador, with frequent flights in and out of the Oriente to facilitate easier travel to the region for military personnel, missionaries, various aid groups and charter companies. Around noon, you will depart in a light aircraft to the Huaorani community of Quehueri’ono (keh-weri-oh-noh), only to be warmly greeted by your guests after a short 35-minute flight. From here, you will start your expedition downstream in a shallow dugout canoe called a quilla (kee-yah). Your luggage will be taken ahead separately, so be sure to keep your camera, binoculars, sunscreen and hat on-board with you. Rubber boots and rain ponchos will be distributed at this point.

Immediately, you will begin to enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of the Amazon. The entire paddle downstream will be filled with amazing wildlife viewing, and you’ll likely catch a glimpse and photo of the many riverside birds, including the Yellow-rumped Cacique, the Greater and Lesser Kiskadees, and any of the four Amazonian kingfishers. You won’t want to put your camera down as you traverse the mighty Shiripuno River (shire-puno) sandwiched between thick tangles of rainforest vegetation on either side.

Finally, you will arrive at Huaorani Ecolodge, your intimate and comfortable home for the next few days. You’ll have the chance to settle in, have lunch listen to an introductory briefing about the Huaorani culture and their relationship with the rainforest at the discovery trail. After dinner, feel free to rest up for day two of your Amazonian  adventure, or if you have an urge to start exploring, ask your guide to lead you on a night walk.


Day 2

Today is hunting day! And you thought this was an environmentally friendly project? Well, it is! Huaorani are hunters and gatherers and their main sources of protein are mammals (yes, including monkeys), fish and birds. The goals of this project are to preserve the traditional practices of the Huaorani culture and to protect the tropical rainforest.

After breakfast, a Huaorani guide will accompany you on a long nature hike into the forest. The local guides are also experienced hunters and they will teach you the secrets of rainforest survival without killing any of the creatures that live there. You’ll learn how to set traps, make fire without matches, build a shelter in minutes, use a blowgun, practice the perfect swing of the machete and catch fish in small creeks. Your guide may also point out and let you taste edible insects, identify and explain the uses of medicinal plants, and show you which clay is used to make pottery.

The trail has two overlooks as it winds toward the community. There are tree trunk seats for some much-needed rest and will allow you to enjoy the view over the forest canopy, where you may see vultures soaring and trees in bloom.

Afterwards, you’ll have time to change into your swimsuit and take a dip in the fresh river water, swimming beside the creatures of the Amazon. Do not worry, though, the animals won’t bite; humans are the only true threat in the jungle! Most likely, members of the Huaorani community will join you for the swim; the river plays a central role in their lives and they love to play in the water! Shortly after, you’ll fill up on a hearty lunch near the community.

The afternoon will be spent with the community, when you’ll get to know the members personally. The relaxed, informal visit may lead you to share a bowl of chucula (a sweet drink made of ripe bananas) under the filtered light of the thatched houses, or admire the beautiful handmade artifacts, including woven hammocks and bags, blowguns, traps and necklaces. You’ll also have the chance to visit the Bi-cultural Ecology Education project and learn how to harvest manioc, also known as yucca or cassava. Perhaps you will be invited to join in a game of ecua-volley!

If you’d like, you can visit the community’s handicraft market and purchase some of the products. The production of crafts is one of the ways the Huaorani maintain their culture, and buying crafts is way to provide direct support the Huaorani families: it provides employment in the village and another reason to protect the natural areas around the community. You return to the lodge by canoe at the end of the afternoon to relax and have dinner, then your naturalist guide will offer a half hour discussion, or charla, on a subject of interest. Like the day before, if you’d like to extend your day and continue observing, ask your guide to bring you on a short night hike.


Day 3

After breakfast, you set off canoeing down the Shiripuno River in traditional Huaorani style, or you can choose to kayak instead at an additional cost. Today the day starts extra early in order to catch a glimpse of the many different birds out at these hours. The tranquility of the morning will allow you to appreciate the true peace and calm of the rainforest, and is  the perfect time to relax and engage in intimate conversations, reflect on the past few days of the journey, or to learn some Huaorani vocabulary.

Next up is a stop at the Apaika community, which lives inside the Yame Reserve, a 55,000-hectare protected area managed by the Huaorani Association, who leads the region’s   ecotourism initiatives. Here you will enjoy a quick snack and visit Apaika’s mini interpretation center, where you can learn more about Yasuní National Park. To complete the afternoon, you’ll be able to join the community in some of its daily activities and share in its history, myths and magic.

Afterwards, the group continues a couple more hours downriver near the Huaorani village of Nenquepare. You will spend the night here, camping out along the Shiripuno River, sleeping with the sounds of the Amazon’s animals. The well-constructed and comfortable campsite is part of a community initiative, so you will really get to participate in and support community tourism at its finest.


Day 4

Before the return journey and after being treated to a delicious breakfast, you will have the opportunity to hike the community trail to visit an impressive waterfall, one that has   special importance for the Huaorani. Once there, you can take a dip in the energizing waters to recharge for the trip back to Quito. The fairly easy walk is three hours altogether, and your naturalist guide will be sure to point out any special plants and animals you may come across.

Once back at the campsite, the group will bid farewell and start the return journey downstream in canoe. This will begin the “toxic tour,” an introduction to how the oil industry has impacted the Huaorani lands. The group will head to the border between traditional Huaorani territory and that of the petroleum companies, though it all used to belong to the Huaorani. Here you will see the road built by oil companies in the early 1970s, which crosses the river, and transitions from forest to “civilization.”

Roads are symbols of modern deforestation, providing access and means for human populations to grow at a rapid rate. This affects indigenous peoples by displacing them from the best and most accessible agricultural soils (which aren’t particularly well suited to begin with), reducing the amount of land available for their hunting and gathering practices, and  encouraging them via settler example and government policy to increase their reliance on agriculture and timber extraction.

On this short tour, you will witness the crude reality of our collective thirst for oil as you ride alongside miles of pipelines, which go from the Huaorani community of Tihuino to Lago Agrio, the oil hub of el Oriente, to be pumped across the Andes to the port of Esmeraldas. This brief journey through oil territory illustrates the reality of the threat facing the rainforest and the Huaorani people. You will also realize why your visit to Huaorani Lodge was so important!

After a 2-hour overland ride down the auca road, you will reach the banks of the Río Napo and the town of Coca, where you will catch your flight to Quito.

Day 1

Your journey to the Amazon begins early in the morning after being picked up at your hotel. Leaving the bustling metropolis of Quito, you will be treated to the beautiful sceneries of the Ecuadorian countryside as transportation heads south, transitioning from the Andes to the Amazon (locally known as the Oriente). The excursion winds along the impressive Avenue of Volcanoes—a strip of 14 active, semi-active and dormant volcanic mountains—passing traditional haciendas, indigenous villages and protected natural areas, giving you a taste for the local culture. With luck and clear weather, you’ll be able to see the remarkably steep peaks in all their glory, including the cone-shaped Cotopaxi, one of the highest active volcanoes in the world, and Tungurahua, which has ongoing eruptions.

Baños (bah-nyos), named for its thermal baths that draw thousands of visitors per year and known for its adrenaline-pumping adventure sports and melcocha taffy, will be the first major town on the way. Your journey will continue into its surrounding green landscapes punctuated by beautiful cascading waterfalls, riding adjacent to the Agoyan River (which changes name to Pastaza once it crosses into the province of the same name) while passing under several tunnels.

Heading onward to the jungle, you’ll start to notice changes in vegetation, with Spanish moss, bananas and tropical palms beginning to dominate the countryside. Four or five hours later, you will arrive to the town of Shell, named after the oil company. This hosts the third busiest airport in Ecuador, with frequent flights in and out of the Oriente to facilitate easier travel to the region for military personnel, missionaries, various aid groups and charter companies. Around noon, you will depart in a light aircraft to the Huaorani community of Quehueri’ono (keh-weri-oh-noh), only to be warmly greeted by your guests after a short 35-minute flight. From here, you will start your expedition downstream in a shallow dugout canoe called a quilla (kee-yah). Your luggage will be taken ahead separately, so be sure to keep your camera, binoculars, sunscreen and hat on-board with you. Rubber boots and rain ponchos will be distributed at this point.

Immediately, you will begin to enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of the Amazon. The entire paddle downstream will be filled with amazing wildlife viewing, and you’ll likely catch a glimpse and photo of the many riverside birds, including the Yellow-rumped Cacique, the Greater and Lesser Kiskadees, and any of the four Amazonian kingfishers. You won’t want to put your camera down as you traverse the mighty Shiripuno River (shire-puno) sandwiched between thick tangles of rainforest vegetation on either side.

Finally, you will arrive at Huaorani Ecolodge, your intimate and comfortable home for the next few days. You’ll have the chance to settle in, have lunch listen to an introductory briefing about the Huaorani culture and their relationship with the rainforest at the discovery trail. After dinner, feel free to rest up for day two of your Amazonian  adventure, or if you have an urge to start exploring, ask your guide to lead you on a night walk.


Day 2

Today is hunting day! And you thought this was an environmentally friendly project? Well, it is! Huaorani are hunters and gatherers and their main sources of protein are mammals (yes, including monkeys), fish and birds. The goals of this project are to preserve the traditional practices of the Huaorani culture and to protect the tropical rainforest.

After breakfast, a Huaorani guide will accompany you on a long nature hike into the forest. The local guides are also experienced hunters and they will teach you the secrets of rainforest survival without killing any of the creatures that live there. You’ll learn how to set traps, make fire without matches, build a shelter in minutes, use a blowgun, practice the perfect swing of the machete and catch fish in small creeks. Your guide may also point out and let you taste edible insects, identify and explain the uses of medicinal plants, and show you which clay is used to make pottery.

The trail has two overlooks as it winds toward the community. There are tree trunk seats for some much-needed rest and will allow you to enjoy the view over the forest canopy, where you may see vultures soaring and trees in bloom.

Afterwards, you’ll have time to change into your swimsuit and take a dip in the fresh river water, swimming beside the creatures of the Amazon. Do not worry, though, the animals won’t bite; humans are the only true threat in the jungle! Most likely, members of the Huaorani community will join you for the swim; the river plays a central role in their lives and they love to play in the water! Shortly after, you’ll fill up on a hearty lunch near the community.

The afternoon will be spent with the community, when you’ll get to know the members personally. The relaxed, informal visit may lead you to share a bowl of chucula (a sweet drink made of ripe bananas) under the filtered light of the thatched houses, or admire the beautiful handmade artifacts, including woven hammocks and bags, blowguns, traps and necklaces. You’ll also have the chance to visit the Bi-cultural Ecology Education project and learn how to harvest manioc, also known as yucca or cassava. Perhaps you will be invited to join in a game of ecua-volley!

If you’d like, you can visit the community’s handicraft market and purchase some of the products. The production of crafts is one of the ways the Huaorani maintain their culture, and buying crafts is way to provide direct support the Huaorani families: it provides employment in the village and another reason to protect the natural areas around the community. You return to the lodge by canoe at the end of the afternoon to relax and have dinner, then your naturalist guide will offer a half hour discussion, or charla, on a subject of interest. Like the day before, if you’d like to extend your day and continue observing, ask your guide to bring you on a short night hike.


Day 3

If you’d like to do some wildlife watching prior to breakfast, feel free to ask your guide. Otherwise, your day will start with the daily scheduled breakfast. After fueling up for another exciting day in the rainforest, you’ll embark on three-hour hike through the terra firme (never flooded whose composition is predominantly tall trees with little understory vegetation) and varzea (occasionally-flooded) forest. The trail winds through towering trees and across 10 different streams, following the Heliconia swamp to the summit of a small hill where a giant ceibo tree stands. This massive tree reaches 40 meters/131 feet high and has an equally impressive width around.

Branching off the Ceibo Trail, you follow a path that parallels the Shiripuno River for some time, crossing several small tributaries, including one that some White-collared peccaries bathe in. Don’t be surprised if you come across their tracks and tusk marks, or if you catch a whiff of their distinctive smell. Continuing on through the open forest, you’ll climb over several gentle hills until you reach a lead-cutter ant metropolis on the edge of a small oxbow lake. There you’ll find a mirador, or viewpoint, where you can see the ants in action! From there, you’ll follow the lake back to the river, where the canoe will meet the group to take you back to the lodge. Expect to see some colorful aquatic birds and reptiles in their natural habitats on the way!

Lunch will be served at the lodge, and then you will canoe back downstream to an oxbow lake formed by the Shiripuno River (Cocha Pequeña). From there, you will walk inland for a few minutes, where you will have the opportunity to catch a glimpse of the extraordinary Hoatzin (one of the few birds that feeds almost exclusively on leaves), as well as anacondas,  capybaras (world’s largest rodent) and caimans (types of alligator) with some luck.

On the way back, you’ll be dropped off across from the lodge where you will begin to climb to the top of a hill to witness a frequently used salt-clay lick. Many animals gather here to feed off of the mineral-rich clay, and if the animals haven’t been scared away, you will get to see them in action. If it is inactive, you will still have the opportunity to see how the lick functions and its importance as a dietary supplement for rainforest creatures.

The return trip is a brief night outing to see nocturnal animals. Most of the rainforest animals are actually nocturnal, so this is your best opportunity to see some of these elusive creatures, or at least hear  them climbing through the trees or digging for food. The night comes alive with gigantic buzzing insects, shimmery-skinned snakes and beady-eyed caimans, and you’ll be able to see a sampling of these critters.

Day 4

After breakfast, you set off canoeing down the Shiripuno River in traditional Huaorani style, or you can choose to kayak instead at an additional cost. Today the day starts extra early in order to catch a glimpse of the many different birds out at these hours. The tranquility of the morning will allow you to appreciate the true peace and calm of the rainforest, and is  the perfect time to relax and engage in intimate conversations, reflect on the past few days of the journey, or to learn some Huaorani vocabulary.

Next up is a stop at the Apaika community, which lives inside the Yame Reserve, a 55,000-hectare protected area managed by the Huaorani Association, who leads the region’s   ecotourism initiatives. Here you will enjoy a quick snack and visit Apaika’s mini interpretation center, where you can learn more about Yasuní National Park. To complete the afternoon, you’ll be able to join the community in some of its daily activities and share in its history, myths and magic.

Afterwards, the group continues a couple more hours downriver near the Huaorani village of Nenquepare. You will spend the night here, camping out along the Shiripuno River, sleeping with the sounds of the Amazon’s animals. The well-constructed and comfortable campsite is part of a community initiative, so you will really get to participate in and support community tourism at its finest.


Day 5

Before the return journey and after being treated to a delicious breakfast, you will have the opportunity to hike the community trail to visit an impressive waterfall, one that has   special importance for the Huaorani. Once there, you can take a dip in the energizing waters to recharge for the trip back to Quito. The fairly easy walk is three hours altogether, and your naturalist guide will be sure to point out any special plants and animals you may come across.

Once back at the campsite, the group will bid farewell and start the return journey downstream in canoe. This will begin the “toxic tour,” an introduction to how the oil industry has impacted the Huaorani lands. The group will head to the border between traditional Huaorani territory and that of the petroleum companies, though it all used to belong to the Huaorani. Here you will see the road built by oil companies in the early 1970s, which crosses the river, and transitions from forest to “civilization.”

Roads are symbols of modern deforestation, providing access and means for human populations to grow at a rapid rate. This affects indigenous peoples by displacing them from the best and most accessible agricultural soils (which aren’t particularly well suited to begin with), reducing the amount of land available for their hunting and gathering practices, and  encouraging them via settler example and government policy to increase their reliance on agriculture and timber extraction.

On this short tour, you will witness the crude reality of our collective thirst for oil as you ride alongside miles of pipelines, which go from the Huaorani community of Tihuino to Lago Agrio, the oil hub of el Oriente, to be pumped across the Andes to the port of Esmeraldas. This brief journey through oil territory illustrates the reality of the threat facing the rainforest and the Huaorani people. You will also realize why your visit to Huaorani Lodge was so important!

After a 2-hour overland ride down the auca road, you will reach the banks of the Río Napo and the town of Coca, where you will catch your flight to Quito.

Overview

The Campsite, situated in the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve has a spectacular setting on the banks of the Shiripuno River and it’s the perfect base to discover the Nenkepare Waterfall, one of the Ecuadorian Amazon’s most breathtaking wild sites. A rich cultural canoe and walking program will expose you to various facets of the Huaorani life: blowgun demonstrations, fire making, hammock weaving, food preparation and tree climbing construction are some of the many different experiences you will share. During the evenings, you will chat with your Huaorani guides on the local culture and spiritual beliefs, as the tell you ancient stories passed down from their ancestors who also occupied the same forests you  will visit. This adventure is for reasonably fit guests and is led by experienced naturalists guides.


Facilities

The well-constructed and comfortable Huaorani Adventure Campsite, provides basic accommodations with the surrounding environment and the Huaorani culture. The  accommodation consists of tents set on four individual raised platforms, one meter above the ground. Each tent protects you from the mosquitos but is open to the fresh air and the sounds of the forest, for an authentic adventure camping experience. The campsite has shared bathroom with running water (non heated). Meals are taken in the dining area located  on the banks of the Shiripuno River. In the evening there is an open fire where guests congregate and chat over the day’s events. The campsite has no electricity and candles provide  light. A generator is turned on once a day to pump water from the river. Please bring your cameras charged and a good flashlight.


Day 1

From Coca, we will drive through the jungle for two hours until we reach the Shiripuno River. Upon arrival to the Shiripuno Bridge, we will have a quick safety introduction before setting off on our journey upriver in motorized canoe. As soon as the canoe starts moving, our naturalist guide will begin to identify the different plants, birds and animals surrounding us. We will continue upstream until we arrive at the Huaorani Territory and Reserve, where lunch will be served.

In the afternoon, we will head out to the hunting trail, accompanied by our bilingual naturalist guide and an experienced local guide who will be equipped with a hand made spear and blowgun. Huaorani are traditionally hunters and gathers, and you will get a chance to experience how they interact with the forest. Overall, time is flexible here and you may learn how to set traps, build small shelters or use a blowgun, or simply identify different medicinal plants. This part of the tour is strictly a demonstration of how the Huaorani have hunted these forests for generations, and there will not be any actual hunting. In the evening, our staff will prepare a fresh dinner for us.


Day 2

Yame reserve, Yasuni National Park and Apaika Community

Today we will head upriver on an hour canoe ride and stop at the Apaika community, which is set in the heart of the Yame Reserve, a 55,000-hectare protected area managed by the Huaorani Communities that inhabit this region and lead the ecotourism initiatives. Here you will visit Apaika’s mini interpretation center, where you can learn more about Yasuní  National Park. You’ll also be able to join the community in some of its daily activities and share in its history, myths and magic.

We will return to the campsite in late afternoon silently drifting down river without a motor so there is a better chance of spotting wildlife all along the way. As we drift downstream, we will continue taking in all the sights, sounds and smells of the Amazon. The Nenkepare community will greet us at the campsite and we will have the opportunity to learn more about the Huaorani people through their very own stories.

A night walk offers a novel perspective and focuses your senses: your vision is reduced to the narrow beams of the flashlights and which in turn enhances your other senses, specifically your hearing. Since most rainforest animals are nocturnal – especially mammals and amphibians – this is your best opportunity to see some of these elusive creatures, or at least hear them climbing through the trees or digging for food.

Besides rustling, your ears will pick up the sounds of night monkeys and kinkajous leaping, owls and tinamous calling, cicadas and katydids trying to attract mates, and frogs croaking at one another…so don’t forget your flashlight


Day 3

Magic Waterfall and reality tour

One of the major highlights is hiking to one of the region’s most stunning waterfall. The Huaorani built and maintain a trail to this magnificent waterfall, which has special significance to the community. The easy stroll to the cascade and back takes about three hours, and once you arrive at the waterfall, you can jump into the clear, energizing waters to  recharge for the return walk. Along the way, your naturalist guide will point out the special features of the area influenced by the humidity of the falls as well as the special plants and animals you might have the opportunity to see. A small charge will be made to cover the costs of maintaining the trail.

This is a moderate hike of about 90 minutes, beginning with a short steep ascent after which you walk along the ridges of undulating hills allowing you views midway into the canopy, where you may see such birds as toucans, piping guans and hawks. Listen for the incessant call of the Screaming Piha, a loud but small bird that is rarely spotted.

After our morning hike we will leave the campsite to begin our return journey to Coca and onward to Quito. This revealing route is also known as the “toxic tour,” which will expose you to the harsh reality of how oil companies have impacted Huaorani territory. We will drive back on the road constructed by Texaco in the 1970s as a way to access the oil fields and then continue alongside miles of pipelines, which go from the Huaorani community of Tihuino to Lago Agrio, the oil hub of el Oriente, to be pumped across the Andes to the port of Esmeraldas. This will allow us to see and experience the oil industry’s impact and what their brochures don’t show. It also helps put in prospective the importance of indigenous people who protect their lands such as the Huaorani..

At Coca our program ends, you can flight back to Quito or continue your amazon explorations.

Huaorani Ecolodge Rates 2016

INCLUSIONS
 
 
Accommodation in lodge &/or campsite
 

All meals, water, coffee & tea

 
All activities as listed
 
Native & bilingual guide
 
Aquatic transportation (entering lodge in dugout canoe)
 
Camping equipment & gear
 
Use of lodge &/or campsite facilities

EXCLUSIONS
 
 
Land transport (Quito – Shell / Lodge – Coca) or (Quito-Coca-Quito), transfer (hotel-airport-hotel)
 
Air transport (Shell – Lodge / Coca – Quito) or (Quito-Coca-Quito)
 
Huaorani territory entrance fee & shell tax ($25.10)
 
Bar consumptions
 
Private guide or optional services
 
Aquatic activity (kayaking)
 
Personal expenses, travel insurance, souvenirs, tipping (guide & staff)

 

Children Allowed: Yes
Children Minimum Age: None

Child Discount: 50%
Considered Child: Under 12 years

Terms & Conditions

The above Terms & Conditions/Policies do not represent to a full extent all the terms & conditions by the Lodge, the most important and relevant clauses have been listed as a guideline, and are enforced by the tour operator to GreenGo Travel as your acting travel agent and subsequently to the end customer. In cases such as the initial percentage of payment required, the amount of days prior to cover the final balance & cancellation fees will be subject to our terms and conditions. A higher/lower initial payment, and additional time may be required to process your reservation.

  • GreenGo Travel

    Rating

    Average Rating: 5
  • GreenGo Travel

    Rating

    Average Rating: 5
  • GreenGo Travel

    Rating

    Average Rating: 5
  • GreenGo Travel

    Rating

    Average Rating: 5
  • GreenGo Travel

    Rating

    Average Rating: 5
  • GreenGo Travel

    Rating

    Average Rating: 5
  • GreenGo Travel

    Rating

    Average Rating: 5

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Lago Agrio - Ecuador
Medium - High
4 - 5 DAYS
Amazon Dolphin Lodge
Amazon Dolphin Lodge
Starting At
$649
$600
VIEW LODGE
Coca - Ecuador
Medium - High
 
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